Learn. Connect. Innovate. Join Us at the DELMIA Community Summit!

You asked and we listened! We are now expanding our DELMIA Community Summit beyond customers to include those who are interested in learning more. Join us at the DELMIA Community Summit May 16th at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. This event brings together DELMIA customers, DELMIA technical experts, partners and more for a day of networking, sharing and innovation. Who doesn’t need that? Participating DELMIA customers will get even more immeasurable benefits: the opportunity to knowledge-share and learn how other customers are using DELMIA solutions; the benefits they have achieved; plans for future innovation, and much more. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to experience live solution demos and engage with DELMIA professionals through interactive sessions and networking events.

Need another reason to attend? As you know, a digital experience platform allows manufacturers to visualize and control in the virtual world what cannot be seen in the real world. In fact, our digital experience transforms supply chains into digital value networks and empowers the talents of the workforce of the future by capturing, delivering and re-using knowledge and know-how to enable new categories of sustainable solutions. To keep the pace of the industry, manufacturers need to be faster, more integrated and more agile than ever. Our DELMIA experts will show you how.

Be a part of one of our biggest events and take advantage of the opportunity to network with a plethora of industry influencers. Don’t miss out! Join us for innovative key topics including DELMIA 2019, DELMIA Digital Manufacturing, DELMIA Manufacturing Operations Management, and DELMIA Planning & Optimization.  

The DELMIA COMMUNITY SUMMIT will be co-located with the Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE FORUM, which will take place May 13-15 at Caesars Palace. Take advantage of these two events to learn how to evolve your company in a global Industry Renaissance.

Check out the agenda and Register today! http://go.3ds.com/AXX

Join our DELMIA Communities on 3DSwYm to connect with DELMIA users and technical experts.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.apriso.com/blog/2019/04/learn-connect-innovate-join-us-at-the-delmia-community-summit/

Preparing to Integrate IIoT: How can controls, automation, and instrumentation help with integration and use of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) technologies? (Part 1)

This is the first of a two-part series on the integration and use of IIoT technology.

As advances in technology make it more cost-effective to deploy IIoT, industries will need to acquire a strategic approach to integrating new sensor data with pre-existing data environments.

Now, more than ever, industries are seeking simple integrations with controls, automation, and data analytics visualization software to harness the power of the Industrial Internet of Things and realize attractive operational and competitive benefits for their business.IIoT can unite people and systems on the plant floor with those at the enterprise level, and enable users to get the most value from their automated systems while reducing technological and economic limitations. To ensure successful deployment of the IIoT, industrial organizations can benefit from embracing new network design infrastructures, including developing a reliable framework that supports collaborative work processes across functional lines, as well as between internal and external resources.

New systems to integrate IIoT

Processes, digital devices and business systems can support implementation of the Industrial Internet of Things, from small companies new to the IIoT potential up to large industries that can benefit from adding new sensors into their present systems for internal and external assets. From laying the foundations to help guide future technology investments to easing the integration of the current systems with new controls, automation and data processing benefits, there are ways to help smooth the process and transition for getting the desired results. When looking at new systems for IIoT implementation, it is recommended to examine the following seven areas for benefits:

  • Assess the Baseline: Look at assets, processes, data collection, analytics, and real-time visibility to assess the ability to predict and detect issues and opportunities; for example, what type of sensors, cameras and other instrumentation is available to make use of available data tracking potentialities?
  • Boost the Capabilities: Use machine learning, Big Data, and automation technologies to create an über-system that can accurately and consistently capture, analyze, and transmit data with visualized dashboards for operations management.
  • Integrate the Potential: Employing open integration and communications technologies can help connect data from varied sources on the way to extracting meaningful value for decision-making. This can include software that brings high fidelity data from disparate operational sources to people in all corners of a clients’ enterprise – wherever, whenever and however it is needed.
  • Consolidate Data: Look to centralizing data in the Cloud with new applications that connect multiple disparate systems, applying higher level analytics and leveraging expertise with the benefits of being physically remote from the operating site.
  • Make it Visual: Consider employing cloud-based applications that add value, such as advanced process control (APC) monitoring, condition-based monitoring (CBM), enterprise data historians, mobility solutions, and planning and scheduling tools. This new instrumentation can help facilitate real-time decision making plus allow long-term data tracking for precise adjustments.
  • Re-define Teamwork: With these new controls and automation tools, look to define how functional groups can work together and how to enable smart collaboration across the organization using IIoT advantages; this may include sharing data in operations, maintenance, system reliability, supply chain management, and other potential synergies.
  • Make Alliances with the Experts: Stay flexible with new updates and demographic changes using technology tools and collaborations with third-party experts that understand industrial automation, process data, and control-related issues across the enterprise. Traditional information technology (IT) providers may not offer that depth, and the potential for niche integration consultants is ripe for growth.

Continue the conversation by joining our DELMIA Communities on 3DSwYm. Membership is free.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.apriso.com/blog/2019/04/preparing-to-integrate-iiot-how-can-controls-automation-and-instrumentation-help-with-integration-and-use-of-industrial-internet-of-things-iiot-technologies-part-1/

What Role Does Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance Play in Manufacturing?

In the manufacturing industry, equipment maintenance is integral to keeping your company running. If a piece of equipment fails, the downtime is expensive — both in equipment repair costs and lost production time. Depending on how much you produce in an average day, a single hour of downtime can cost you anywhere from $1,000 to $10,000 or more. Monitoring and predictive maintenance can help you keep everything moving smoothly. What role do these two tools play in manufacturing?

Predictive Maintenance vs. Preventive Maintenance

Before we get into predictive maintenance and monitoring, we do need to address a different form of maintenance — preventive. Preventive maintenance is merely the practice of fixing small problems before they become big ones. Changing the oil in your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations is preventive maintenance. You probably already have a schedule in place for preventive maintenance for each piece of equipment — replacing belts, changing oil or grease and inspecting each moving part for signs of wear and tear that could indicate the beginnings of more significant problems.

Predictive maintenance, especially when paired with monitoring, takes preventive maintenance to a whole new level.

What Is Predictive Maintenance?

You most likely already have a maintenance schedule in place for going over each piece of machinery on your production floor to help keep everything running. Each piece has its manufacturer-recommended maintenance schedule, and keeping up with that can prevent any unscheduled downtime. Sometimes, though, equipment fails. What if you could predict those failures and fix the problems before they take your production floor offline?

That’s where predictive maintenance comes in.

A predictive maintenance algorithm examines your maintenance and repair history, using data you’ve collected over months or years. It’s programmed to look for patterns human observers might miss. These patterns can indicate when a piece of equipment might fail outside its regular maintenance schedule. With enough information, these programs can even predict future failures.

Remote Equipment Monitoring

While predictive maintenance can help you predict equipment failures, these algorithms are only as good as the data they have to work with. That’s where monitoring comes in.

Wi-Fi-enabled monitoring can help you keep track of the state of your equipment in real time. You can check any machine at any time from a computer or even from a smartphone. These sensors can also feed data directly into your predictive maintenance system, providing more accurate information than you can obtain by putting the info into the computer manually after regular repairs.

Benefits of Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance

Why should you consider investing in a monitoring and predictive maintenance system for your plant?

As we’ve already mentioned, downtime is costly. Any unexpected equipment failure could potentially cost you thousands of dollars while you wait for a repair. A predictive maintenance and monitoring system improves the reliability of your plant, keeping the machines available and making them safer for workers to use.

This kind of regular monitoring can also prevent or lessen regular downtime. You won’t have to take machines offline to inspect them if they have onboard monitors, because someone is always able to watch them. You will still need to bring them offline for regular maintenance, but inspections no longer need to result in downtime.

Investing in this new hardware and software can also help prevent catastrophic failures, which could result in even more expensive repairs or even equipment replacement.

Keeping your equipment running smoothly and reducing downtime will improve your productivity and workplace efficiency.

Predictive maintenance and monitoring are two more tools you can slip into your manufacturing toolbelt to keep your process running smoothly. Instead of waiting for your equipment to fail, or spending a lot of time with it offline so you can inspect the machine, you can use monitors and software to predict problems before they cause the equipment to break down.

The goal here is to keep your machines online as long as possible. With this hardware and software installed, you don’t have to shut down the equipment to keep a close eye on it. Installing predictive maintenance and monitoring systems can take some time and some getting used to, but it can save you thousands of dollars in repair and downtime.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.apriso.com/blog/2019/04/what-role-does-monitoring-and-predictive-maintenance-play-in-manufacturing/

Inventory Optimization in the Supply Chain

Every company wants to have the right amount of the right inventory in the right place at the right time, and that has been the primary focus of Material Requirements Planning (MRP) software and its successors and descendants including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and Distribution Requirements Planning. Traditional planning systems use traditional logic that calculates a time-phased replenishment plan. But very few professionals have been totally satisfied with the MRP approach. While the MRP approach does develop a reasonable and logical plan that’s far better than guesswork, min-max, or order point strategies, it is entirely dependent on the accuracy of the forecast and does not recognize or react to anything outside of the “normal” – like supply chain disruptions, delays in production or distribution, or changing costs, availability, or priorities.

Optimization (for a more general discussion of optimization see the previous blog, Why is Optimization Important for Supply Chain Planning) is designed to take those dynamic factors into consideration by comparing different strategies in order to determine a “best” approach among all the alternatives. The user sets the priority by defining what “best” means – lowest overall cost, best customer service, minimum transportation cost, staying within warehouse capacity limits – or more likely some combination of these. Lowest overall cost to maintain 95% service level without exceeding warehouse capacity anywhere in the network, for example.

The system will then try many, many different combinations of replenishment opens (quantity and timing), transportation choices (truck is faster but rail is cheaper), warehouse inventory strategies (it’s more economical to store a larger quantity at a feeder warehouse serving more distribution points but transportation costs will likely be higher and customer service will suffer), and other trade-offs to find the best combination within whatever restrictions may exist – like warehouse size or container volume limits.

Understand, of course, that all these factors are changing constantly. Fuel and transportation costs are notoriously volatile as are taxes, duties, and capacity availability. Likewise, customer demand is always changing, often unpredictably, and there are those supply chain disruptions mentioned previously. The good news is that optimization routines can be rerun as often as you like. Even though you don’t want to be changing strategies minute-by-minute, it’s really useful to see the impact of any disturbance that takes place and be able to quickly identify and react to an issue that might affect customer service…and to know the best way to react.

Inventory optimization in the supply chain is focused on where to hold inventory in the distribution network to deliver the desired level of customer service at minimal cost within any limits or restrictions that exist. That may mean that some items are stored in larger quantities closer to the source and distributed in smaller quantities more often down the chain while others are more likely to be held closer to the customer for quick delivery. Optimization brings all those considerations together in a comprehensive plan that delivers the desired performance at minimal cost.

 

This post originally appeared on Navigate the Future, the Dassault Systemes North America blog

Continue the conversation by joining our DELMIA Communities on 3DSwYm. Membership is free.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.apriso.com/blog/2018/12/inventory-optimization-in-the-supply-chain/

The Value of Simulation for Collaborative Robots – Part 2

This is the second of a 2-part series on Cobotics simulation.

In a previous blog I introduced the concept of Cobotics, or the use of Collaborative Robots and described the benefits of cobotics work cell simulation which include:

  • Secure accessibility for both humans and robots
  • Secure human tasks using ergonomics validation
  • Human / robot interaction validation
  • Optimum production capacity
  • Human safety compliance

This article will introduce Virtual Commissioning and how it increases the value of Cobotics and more generally, the production work cell.

What is Virtual Commissioning?

First, some numbers:

  • 75% of projects exceed the final budget
  • 30% of projects are delayed, leading to additional cost and lost sales
  • 60% of commissioning time is used to identify and eliminate problems with control software, protocols, and integration.

On the other hand, in a robot work cell:

  • 1/3 of the time is dedicated to the component set-up and tool tuning (mechanical domain)
  • 1/3 of the time is used by the robotics engineer to set-up the robot program and trajectory
  • 1/3 of the time is used by the programmable logic controller (PLC) programmer to complete the global work cell availability

For security reasons, it is impossible to have these three teams physically working together in the cell. Consequently, because some companies split the day into three shifts to have engineers working consecutively, delays in work cell set-up are increasing.

Fortunately, there are solutions

  • Offline Programming – decreases the time needed to work physically in the work cell by programming  the robot trajectory in a robotics simulation software
  • Virtual Commissioning – a realistic and intelligent virtual run-time environment for Control Engineers to debug and validate PLC programs prior to physical build

How Co-Simulation for Virtual Commissioning is possible

The co-simulation environment is composed of two domains:

  • The work cell is designed in a 3D environment. Robots, machines, and humans are animated, and sensors are modeled and can simulate with maximum accuracy in terms of performance, reachability, and collision-detection based on the device program and input/output.
  • The definition PLC environment is able to emulate different PLCs available on the market or be connected with a real PLC (hardware in the loop)

Between these two domains, a dedicated fast speed connector is provided that allows real-time communication both ways – orders are sent from the PLC environment to the work cell device and simulation information is sent back from the work cell simulation (sensors information, robot program status, etc).

Thus, all 3D devices are directly controlled by the final PLC program and can realistically simulate the complete behavior of the work cell.

There many benefits of Virtual Commissioning

  • Reduce the risk of errors and damage during ramp-up
  • Improve the quality of delivered PLC code by validating all possible scenarios including non-nominal mode (on average, 80% of the code is dedicated to addressing non-nominal mode)
  • Simulate equipment failure (sensors) and validate the PLC code to address these type of events
  • Validate all safety monitoring scenarios
  • Reduce immobilization of the work cell and reduce debug time and costs at the customer site

The Value of Virtual Commissioning for Cobotics

Obviously, virtual commissioning can be used with the same value because human interface can be modeled and human interaction can be simulated.

Another value is to provide a virtual environment for workers to train in safe conditions and at full capability. It can also validate all scenarios including human error and device failures.

A New Perspective

Imagine putting yourself in the shoes of a worker working with a cobot!  What can be better than being able to:

  • Validate a process thanks to an immersive, human-like experience
  • Train for dedicated tasks
  • Be reassured in front of a cobot
  • Be convinced that this robot is, in fact, more than a robot and can become a partner

Coupled with simulation, this technology helps to provide a smooth transition by introducing robots in the virtual world.

Conclusion

To summarize, simulating a cobotics work cell provides:

  • A collaborative work cell layout design
  • Ergonomics in the same environment
  • Human safety validation
  • Production performance simulation
  • Offline programming, Virtual Commissioning
  • Worker training
  • An immersive experience
  • New collaborative equipment design

Simulation of collaborative robots develops your imagination and can accompany you to the next level – an industrial transformation process.

Continue the conversation by joining our DELMIA Communities on 3DSwYm. Membership is free.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.apriso.com/blog/2018/12/the-value-of-simulation-for-collaborative-robots-part-2/